City of Terrell
Water Quality Report
2013 Consumer Confidence Report

For Period of January 1 to December 31, 2013

Terrell water is safe to Drink

About our Drinking water

This Consumer Confidence Report includes information on water source, contaminants found in the water, special health effects, any water drinking violations, and data reporting from January 1 to December 31, 2013.

The City of Terrell is proud of the fine drinking water it provides. This report is intended to provide you with important information about your drinking water and the efforts made by our water system to provide safe drinking water. City of Terrell is Purchased Surface Water system.

Printable Water Quality Report in pdf format

SPECIAL NOTICE

You may be more vulnerable than the general population to certain microbial contaminants, such as Cryptosporidium, in drinking water. Infants, some elderly, or immunocompromised persons such as those undergoing chemotherapy for cancer; those who have undergone organ transplants; those who are undergoing treatment with steroids; and people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders can be particularly at risk from infections. You should seek advice about drinking water from your physician or health care provider. Additional guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791

City of Terrell has superior rated public water YOUR DRINKING WATER IS SAFE

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.
Call us for information about the next opportunity for public participation in decisions about our drinking water. Find out more about the City of Terrell on this website.

CONTAMINANTS

Contaminants may be found in drinking water that may cause taste, color, or odor problems. These types of problems are not necessarily causes for health concerns. For more information on taste, odor, or color of drinking water, please contact us at (972) 551-6600. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. Again, the presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe
Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.

TYPES OF CONTAMINANTS

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and minerals, which can be naturally occurring or result of urban storm runoff, Industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
  • Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm runoff, and septic systems.
  • Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

INFORMATION ABOUT SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENTS

A Source Water Susceptibility Assessment for your drinking water source(s) is currently being updated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. This information describes susceptibilty and types of constituents that may come into contact with your drinking water source based on human activities and natural conditions. The information contained in the assessment allows us to focus source water protection strategies.

For more information about your sources of water, please refer to the SourceWater Assessment Viewer available at the following URL: http://www.tceq.texas.gov/gis/swaview

Further details about sources and source-water assessments are availahle in Drinking Water Watch at the following URL: http://dww.tceq.state.tx.us/DWW/

Call us for information about the next opportunity for public participation in decisions about our drinking water. Find out more about the City of Terrell at our website at http://www.cityofterrell.org

For more information regarding this report contact Dick L. Boyd at (972) 551-6635.

En Espanol
Este reporte incluye informacion importante sobre el agua para tomar. Para asistencia en espanol, favor de llamar al telefone (972) 551-6635.


Where your water comes from

The sources of drinking water (both tap and bottled water include rivers, lakes, streams ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and radioactive material and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

The City of Terrell purchases treated water from North Texas Municipal Water District (NTWMD). NTMWD utilizes four reservoirs: Lavon Lake, Lake Jim Chapman, Lake Tawakoni, and Lake Texamo for their raw water supplies. The City of Terrell's Water Treatment Plant was decommissioned on June 19, 2007.

About Secondary Constituents

Contaminants and many constituents (such as calcium, sodium, iron) which are often found in drinking water can cause taste, color, and odor problems. The taste and odor constituents are called secondary constituents and are regulated by the State of Texas, not the EPA. These contaminants and constituents are not causes for health concern. Therefore, secondary constituents are not required to be reported in this document, but they may greatly effect the appearance and taste of your water. For more information taste, odor, and color of drinking water, please contacts us at (972) 551-6635.


Understanding Water Quality Testing

Definitions:
Action Level Goal (ALG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or risk to health. ALGs allow for a margin of safety.
Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.
Avg: Regulatory compliance with some MCLs are based on running annual average monthly samples.
Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no know or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
Maximum Residual disinfectant level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
MFL: million fibers per liter (a measure of asbestos)
NA: not applicable
NTU: nephelometric turbidity units (a measure of turbidity)
pCi/L: picocuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity)
ppb: micrograms per liter or parts per billion - or one ounce in 7,350,000 gallons of water.

Drinking Water Quality Results

Lead and Copper Results

Year Sampled
Substance
MCLG
Action Level 90th Percentile # Sites Over AL
Units Violations
2013 Copper 1.3 1.3 0.441 0 ppm No
2013 Lead 0 15 2.8 0 ppb No

 

Disinfectants and disinfection by-products

Year Sampled
Substance
Highest Level Detected
Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL
Units Violations
2013 Haloacetic
Acid (HAA5)
21 13.6-17.5 No Goal 60 ppb No
2013 Triahalomethane
(TTHM)
35 28.2-42.4 No Goal 80 ppb No

Haloacetic Acid (HAA5) (Likely Source of Contaminants: Byproduct of drinking water disinfection
Trihalomethane (TTHM) (like Source of Contaminants): Byproduct of drinking water disinfection.

 

Inorganic Contaminants

Year Sampled
Substance
Highest Level Detected
Range of Levels Detected MCLG MCL
Units Violations
2013 Nitrate (Measured as Nitrogen)
0.23 0.23-0.23 10 10 ppm No

Nitrate (measured as Nitrogen): Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

 

Coliform Bacteria

Maximum Contaminant
Level Goal
Total Coliform Maximum
Contaminant Level
Highest No. of Positive
Fecal Coliform or E. Coli Maximum
Contaminant Level
Total No. of Positive E. Coli or Fecal Coliform Samples
Violation
Likely Source of Contamination
4
1 positive monthly sample
0
0
0
no
Naturally present in the environment.
NOTE: Reported monthly tests found no fecal coliform bacteria. Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potential harmful, bacteria may be present.
 

Regulated Contaminants

Inorganic Contaminants

Inorganic Contaminants
Collection
Date
Highest Level
Detected
Range of Levels
Detected
MCLG
MCL
Units
Violation
Likely Source of Contamination
Antimony
2013
Levels lower than detect level
0-0
6
6
ppb
No
Discharge from petroleum refineries; fire retardants; ceramics; electronics; solder; and test addition.
Arsenic
2013
1.1
1.12-1.12
0
10
ppb
No
Erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards; runoff from glass and electronics production wastes.
Barium
2013
.05
.05-.05
2
2
ppm
No
Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits.
Beryllium
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
4
4
ppb
No
Discharge from metal refineries and coal-burning factories; discharge from electrical, aerospace, and defense industries.
Cadmium
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
5
5
ppb
No
Corrosion of galvanized pipes; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from metal refineries; runoff from waste batteries and paints.
Chromium
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
100
100
ppb
No
Discharge from steel and pulp mills; erosion of natural deposits.
Fluoride
2013
0.46
46-.46
4
4 pCi/L
ppm
No
Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.
Mercury
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
2
2
ppb
No
Erosion of natural deposits; discharge from refineries and factories; runoff from landfills; runoff from cropland.
Nitrate
2013
0.22
.22-.22
10
10
ppm
No
Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks; sewage; erosion of natural deposits.
Nitrate Advisory: Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome.
Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant you should ask advice from your health care provider.
Selenium
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
50
50
ppb
No
Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from mines.
Thallium
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0.5
2
ppb
No
Discharge from electronics, glass, and leaching from ore-processing sites; drug factories.

Synthetic organic contaminants including pesticides and herbicides

Inorganic Contaminants
Collection
Date
Highest Level
Detected
Range of Levels
Detected
MCLG
MCL
Units
Violation
Likely Source of Contamination
2, 4, 5 - TP (Silvex)
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
50
50
ppb
No
Residue of banned herbicide.
2, 4 - D
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
70
10
ppb
No
Runoff from herbicide used on row crops.
Alachlor
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
2
ppb
No
Runoff from herbicide used on row crops.
Atrazine
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
3
3
ppb
No
Runoff from herbicide used on row crops.
Benzo (a) pyrene
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
200
ppt
No
Leaching from linings of water storage tanks and distribution lines.
Carbofuran
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
40
40
ppb
No
Leaching of soil fumigant used on rice and alfalfa.
Chlordane
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
2
ppb
No
Residue of banned termiticide.
Dalapon
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
200
200
ppb
No
Runoff from herbicide used on rights of way.
Di (2-ethylhexyl) adipate
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
400
400
ppb
No
Discharge from chemical factories.
Di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
6
ppb
No
Discharge from rubber and chemical factories.
Dibromochloropropane
(DBCP)
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
0
ppt
No
Runoff / leaching from soil fumigant used on soybeans, cotton, pineapples, and orchards.
Dinoseb
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
7
7
ppb
No
Runoff from herbicide used on soybeans and vegetables.
Endrin
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
2
2
ppb
No
Residue of banned insecticide.
Ethylene dibromide
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
50
ppt
No
Discharge from petroleium refineries.
Heptachlor
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
400
ppt
No
Residue of banned termiticide.
Heptachlor epoxide
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
200
ppt
No
Breakdown of heptachlor.
Hexachlorobenzene
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
1
ppb
No
Discharge from metal refineries and agricultural chemical factories.
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
50
50
ppb
No
Discharge from chemical factories.
Lindane
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
200
200
ppt
No
Runoff / leaching from insecticide used on cattle, lumber, and gardens.
Methoxychlor
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
40
40
ppb
No
Runoff / leaching from insecticide used on fruits, vegetables, alfalfa, and livestock.
Oxamyl [Vydate]
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
200
200
ppb
No
Runoff / leaching from insecticide used on apples, potatoes, and tomatoes.
Pentachlorophenol
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
1
ppb
No
Discharge from wood preserving factories.
Simazine
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0.11-0.38
4
4
ppb
No
Herbicide runoff.
Toxaphene
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
3
ppb
No
Runoff / leaching from insecticide used on cotton and cattle.

Radioactive Contaminants

Inorganic Contaminants
Collection
Date
Highest Level
Detected
Range of Levels
Detected
MCLG
MCL
Units
Violation
Likely Source of Contamination
Beta/photon emitters
2012
Levels lower than detect level
0 - 0
0
50
pCi/L
No
Decay of natural and man-made deposits.
Gross alpha excluding
radon and uranium
2012
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
15
pCi/L
No
Erosion of natural deposits.
Radium 2012 Levels lower than detect level 0 - 0 0 5
pCi/L
No
Erosion of natural deposits.

Volatile Organic Contaminants

Inorganic Contaminants
Collection
Date
Highest Level
Detected
Range of Levels
Detected
MCLG
MCL
Units
Violation
Likely Source of Contamination
1, 1, 1 - Trichloroethane
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
200
200
ppb
No
Discharge from metal degreasing sites and other factories.
1, 1, 2 - Trichloroethane
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
3
5
ppb
No
Discharge from industrial chemical factories.
1, 1 - Trichloroethylene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
7
7
ppb
No
Discharge from industrial chemical factories.
1, 2, 4 - Trichlorobenzene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
70
70
ppb
No
Discharge from industrial chemical factories.
1, 2 - Dichloroethane
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
5
ppb
No
Discharge from industrial chemical factories.
1, 2 - Dichloropropane
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
5
ppb
No
Discharge from industrial chemical factories.
Benzene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
5
ppb
No
Discharge from factories; leaching from gas storage tanks and landfills.
Carbon Tetrachloride
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
5
ppb
No
Discharge from chemical plants and other industrial activities.
Chlorobenzene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
100
100
ppb
No
Discharge from chemical and agricultural chemical factories.
Dichloromethane
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
5
ppb
No
Discharge from pharmaceutical and chemical factories.
Ethylbenzene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
700
ppb
No
Discharge from petroleum refineries.
Styrene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
100
100
ppb
No
Discharge from rubber and plastic factories; leaching from landfills.
Tetrachloroethylene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
5
ppb
No
Discharge from factories and dry cleaners.
Toluene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
1
1
ppm
No
Discharge from petroleum factories.
Trichloroethylene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
5
ppb
No
Discharge from metal degreasing sites and other factories.
Vinyl Chloride
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
0
2
ppb
No
Leaching from PVC piping; discharge from plastics factories.
Xylenes
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
10
10
ppm
No
Discharge from petroleum factories; discharge from chemical factories.
cis - 1, 2 -
Dichloroethylene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
70
70
ppb
No
Discharge from industrial chemical factories.
o - Dichlorobenzene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
600
600
ppb
No
Discharge from industrial chemical factories.
p - Dichlorobenzene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
75
75
ppb
No
Discharge from industrial chemical factories.
trans - 1, 2 -
Dicholoroethylene
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
0 - 0
100
100
ppb
No
Discharge from industrial chemical factories.

Maximum Disinfectant Residual

Disinfectant Type
Year
Average Level
Minimum Level
Maximum
Level
MRDL
MRDLG
Units
Source of Chemical
Chlorine Residual
(Chloramines)
2013
3.03
1.10
3.99
4.0
<4.0
ppm
Disinfectant used to control microbes.

 

Unregulated Contaminants

Contaminants
Collection
Date
Highest Level
Detected
Range of Levels
Detected
Units
Likely Source of Contamination
Chloroform
2013
24.7
18.3-24.7
ppb
By-product of drinking water disinfection.
Bromoform
2013
Levels lower
than detect level
Levels lower
than detect level
ppb
By-product of drinking water disinfection.
Bromodichloromethane
2013
11.8
6.8-11.8
ppb
By-product of drinking water disinfection.
Dibromochloromethane
2013
5.89
2.8-5.89
ppb
By-product of drinking water disinfection.
NOTE: Bromoform, chloroform, dichlorobromomethane, and dibromochloromethane are disinfection by-products. There is no maximum contaminant level for these chemicals at the entry point to distribution.

 

Secondary and Other Constituents Not Regulated

Contaminants
Collection
Date
Highest Level
Detected
Range of Levels
Detected
Units
Likely Source of Contamination
Bicarbonate
2013
68.4
68.4-68.4
ppm
Corrosion of carbonate rocks such as limestone.
Calcium
2013
42.9
32.7-42.9
ppm
Abundant naturally occurring element.
Chloride
2013
11.6
11.6-11.6
ppm
Abundant naturally occurring element; used in water purification; by-product of oil field activity.
Hardness as Ca/Mg
2013
138
101-138
ppm
Naturally occurring calcium and magnesium.
Iron
2013
0.28
0.092-0.280
ppm
Erosion of natural deposits; iron or steel water delivery equipment or facilities.
Magnesium
2013
3.6
3.02-3.60
ppm
Abundant naturally occurring element.
Manganese
2013
0.004
.004-.004
ppm
Abundant naturally occurring element.
Nickel
2013
0.001
.001-.001
ppm
Erosion of natural deposits.
pH
2013
8.17
7.50-8.17
units
Measure of corrosivity of water.
Sodium
2013
21.2
15.4-21.2
ppm
Erosion of natural deposits; by-product of oil field activity.
Sulfate
2013
38
38-38
ppm
Naturally occurring; common industrial by-product; by-product of oil field activity.
Total Alkalinity as CaCO3
2013
68.4
68.4-68.4
ppm
Naturally occurring soluble mineral salts.
Total Dissolved Solids
2013
200
200-200
ppm
Total dissolved mineral constituents in water.
Total Hardness as CaCO3
2013
98.4
98.4-98.4
ppm
Naturally occurring calcium.
Zinc
2013
0.002
.002-.002
ppm
Moderately abundant naturally occurring element used in the metal industry.

 

Turbidity

  Limit
(Treatment Technique)
Level Detected Violation Likely Source of Contamination
Highest single measurement 1 NTU 0.3 NTU No Soil runoff.
Lowest monthly percentage (%) meeting limit 0.3 NTU 100.00% No Soil runoff.
Note: Turbidity has no health effects. However, turbidity can interfere with disinfection and provide a medium for microbial growth. Turbidity may indicate the presence of disease – causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses, and parasites that can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea and associated headaches.

 

Total Organic Carbon
Contaminant
Collection
Date
Highest Level
Detected
Range of Levels
Detected
Unit of Measure
Source of Contaminant
Source Water
2013
6.44
5.49-6.44
ppm
Naturally present in environment
Drinking Water
2013
4.02
3.11-4.02
ppm
Naturally present in environment
Removal Ratio
2013
44.6%
32.1-44.6
% removal*
N/A

*Removal ratio is the percent of TOC removed by the treatment process divided by the percent of TOC required by TCEQ to be removed.

Note: Total Organic Carbon (TOC) has no health effects. The disinfectant can combine with TOC to form disinfection byproducts. Disinfection is necessary to ensure that water does not have unacceptable levels of pathogens. Byproducts of disinfection include trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAA) which are reported elsewhere in this report.


Cryptosporidium and Giardia

Contaminant
Collection
Date
Highest Level
Detected
Range of Levels
Detected
Unit of Measure
Source of Contaminant
Cryptosporidium
2013
0
0 - 0
(Oo) Cysts/L
Human and animal fecal waste
Giardia
2013
0
0 - 0
(Oo) Cysts/L
Human and animal fecal waste

Note: Taken on samples of raw water

 

Interesting topics: Did you know?

  • In the year 2003, Americans alone spent more than $7 billion on bottled water at an average cost of more than $1 a bottle.

  • An estimated 25 percent or more of bottled water is really just tap water in a bottle—sometimes further treated, sometimes not.

  • While municipal water systems must test for harmful microbiological content in water several times a day, bottled water companies are required to test for these microbes only once a week

  • Alarmingly, the 1999 NRDC study found that 18 of the 103 bottled water brands tested contained, in at least one sample, “more bacteria than allowed under microbiological-purity guidelines.

Source: http://www.allaboutwater.org/references_b.html

 

 

City of Terrell water tower on Poetry Rd.

 

 

 

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City of Terrell
201 East Nash St.
P.O. Box 310

Terrell, Texas 75160
972-551-6600
Metro 972-524-3332
Fax 972-551-6682

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